What is Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM)?

Dr. Sarah Colmer of the University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center describes this neurologic disease and how horses contract it.
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Photo: Stephanie L. Church/The Horse

Dr. Sarah Colmer of the University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center describes this neurologic disease and how horses contract it.

This is an excerpt from our Ask The Horse Live podcast, ‘EPM: Help For Your Horse.’ Listen to the full recording here.

About the Expert:

Sarah F. Colmer

Sarah F. Colmer, VMD, is a third-year resident in large animal internal medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine’s New Bolton Center, in Kennett Square. Following the completion of her residency next month, she will begin a fellowship in large animal neurology at New Bolton Center. She has research interests in neurologic conditions of the horse, particularly degenerative diseases, as well as endocrinology.‚Äã

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Written by:

Michelle Anderson is the former digital managing editor at The Horse. A lifelong horse owner, Anderson competes in dressage and enjoys trail riding. She’s a Washington State University graduate and holds a bachelor’s degree in communications with a minor in business administration and extensive coursework in animal sciences. She has worked in equine publishing since 1998. She currently lives with her husband on a small horse property in Central Oregon.

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