Uveitis (moon blindness)

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Cataracts in Horses

Cataracts have been found to be heritable in Belgians, Morgans, Thoroughbreds, Rocky Mountain Horses, and Quarter Horses. In other instances, cataracts can develop secondary to trauma or due to chronic inflammation from uveitis (moon blindness).

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Uveitis: Medical and Surgical Treatment

Equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is like an autoimmune response, tending to be a dynamic process with shifts in immune reactivity that cause a waxing and waning of uveitis episodes.

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Leptospirosis: What Is It?

Leptospirosis does affect horses, and it can be the cause of some serious health problems, including abortion in pregnant mares and chronic uveitis (moon blindness).

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Moon Blindness

“Moon blindness” is a chronic, painful eye disease, and it’s the most common cause of blindness in horses. It was so named during the 1600s because people thought recurring attacks were related to phases of the moon. This eye disease might be one o

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Ky. Horse Council Forming All-Breed Advisory Group

The Kentucky Horse Council (KHC), a statewide association for all horse owners and enthusiasts, is establishing an All-Breed Advisory Council, to provide a unified voice for the owners of all breeds of horses in Kentucky. The Council

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The Gift of Sight

The lessons I learned from this experience are that if an eye infection does not resolve–or look much improved–in a week, then seek an ophthalmologist or at least ask your veterinarian to take samples of the infected area for further study.

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