Equine Innovators: Pathology is More Than Just Necropsies

Dr. Uneeda Bryant describes how veterinary pathologists safeguard horse populations, determine causes of death, and protect the human-animal bond.
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Dr. Uneeda Bryant
Photo courtesy UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

Dr. Uneeda Bryant describes how veterinary pathologists safeguard horse populations, determine causes of death, and protect the human-animal bond.

The Equine Innovators podcast series is brought to you by Zoetis. You can find the Equine Innovators podcast on TheHorse.com, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcast, and many other podcast apps. Don’t miss a single episode! Sign up now to receive email reminders from The Horse.

 

Show Notes:

About the Expert:

Uneeda Bryant

Dr. Uneeda BryantUneeda Bryant, DVM, is a tenured associate professor of veterinary pathology at the University of Kentucky’s Veterinary Diagnostic Lab, in Lexington. Bryant earned her veterinary degree from Tuskegee University College of Veterinary Medicine, in Alabama. In addition to her responsibilities as a pathologist and teaching role as adjunct faculty for Lincoln Memorial University College of Veterinary Medicine, Bryant works regularly to educate the public about this nontraditional veterinary medicine career path. These endeavors have led to multiple recognitions, including being named a 2015 Alpha Salute at the annual MLK Jr. Unity Breakfast in Lexington; 2016 Ambassador of Science Literacy at the Kentucky Science Center in Louisville, Kentucky; and recognition on the Kentucky Senate floor during the 2018 Senate session in Frankfort.

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Written by:

Stephanie L. Church, Editorial Director, grew up riding and caring for her family’s horses in Central Virginia and received a B.A. in journalism and equestrian studies from Averett University. She joined The Horse in 1999 and has led the editorial team since 2010. A 4-H and Pony Club graduate, she enjoys dressage, eventing, and trail riding with her former graded-stakes-winning Thoroughbred gelding, It Happened Again (“Happy”). Stephanie and Happy are based in Lexington, Kentucky.

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