Emergency Vesicular Stomatitis Rules

Following are summaries of the emergency rules that are in effect currently in Florida and Kentucky, due to the outbreak of VS in New Mexico and Texas. Visit the web sites listed to read the exact wording of the

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Following are summaries of the emergency rules that are in effect currently in Florida and Kentucky, due to the outbreak of VS in New Mexico and Texas. Visit the web sites listed to read the exact wording of the restrictions.


Florida
(Effective May 24, up-to-date as of June 29.)


The Official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (OCVI) for any hooved livestock animal intended for importation into or through Florida from vesicular stomatitis- (VS) affected states must include a special statement that the animals have been found to be free of the disease or vectors of the disease (insects that could carry VS). Any hooved livestock entering Florida from VS-affected states must have advanced permission from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the prior permission number must be stated on the OCVI. In order to be approved for importation, animals must be found to be found free of clinical signs of VS and not have been exposed to nor located within 10 miles of a VS positive premise within the past 30 days. Hooved animals from affected areas that are entering Florida also must go through a mandatory 14-day quarantine upon arrival to the state, and be found free of all clinical signs and vectors of VS before quarantine release.  


Click here for more information regarding Florida’s regulations: https://doacs.state.fl.us/ai/ai_main_vs.htm

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Written by:

Stephanie L. Church, Editorial Director, grew up riding and caring for her family’s horses in Central Virginia and received a B.A. in journalism and equestrian studies from Averett University. She joined The Horse in 1999 and has led the editorial team since 2010. A 4-H and Pony Club graduate, she enjoys dressage, eventing, and trail riding with her former graded-stakes-winning Thoroughbred gelding, It Happened Again (“Happy”). Stephanie and Happy are based in Lexington, Kentucky.

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