Bettor Sues Standardbred Trainer Over Alleged Doping

Jeffrey Tretter alleges that the gelding Tag Up and Go received a banned performance-enhancing substance which caused him to win unexpectedly.
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Standardbred at sunrise
Jeffrey Tretter alleges that the gelding Tag Up and Go received a banned performance-enhancing substance which caused him to win unexpectedly. | Photo: iStock

An Illinois man is suing the trainer of a Standardbred racehorse, alleging that the animal had received a banned performance-enhancing substance which caused him to win unexpectedly.

A complaint filed March 7 in U.S. District Court, in Trenton, New Jersey, said part-time professional pari-mutuel harness racing bettor Jeffrey Tretter alleges that trainer Robert Bresnahan, Jr. and owner J.L. Sadowsky LLC violated federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act and the New Jersey Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act and committed fraud when Bresnahan, Jr. administered the banned substance erythropoietin (EPO) to the gelding Tag Up and Go before a January 2016 race at Meadowlands Racing and Entertainment, in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

A peptide hormone that is produced naturally in the body, EPO is released from the kidneys and acts on the bone marrow to stimulate red blood cell production. An increase in red blood cells improves the amount of oxygen that the blood can carry to the body’s muscles. Administering EPO to horses in order to enhance performance is

“Tag Up and Go pulled significantly ahead of all the other horses in the final stretch and won the race, in an effort that was far beyond what his previous racing form and finishes suggested possible,” the complaint said. “As a result, the horses on which Mr. Tretter placed bets finished second, third, fourth, and fifth, instead of first, second, third, and fourth as he had bet

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Written by:

Pat Raia is a veteran journalist who enjoys covering equine welfare, industry, and news. In her spare time, she enjoys riding her Tennessee Walking Horse, Sonny.

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