Trimming’s Effects on Horse Hoof Morphology

Researchers looked at how four trimming models impact hoof form and structure.
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Trimming
Farriers use a wide range of trimming techniques they use to improve the health and structure of each equine foot and hoof capsule on which they work.| Photo: iStock

Farriers use a wide range of trimming techniques they use to improve the health and structure of each equine foot and hoof capsule on which they work.

During the 2017 International Hoof-Care Summit, held Jan. 24-27, in Cincinnati, Ohio, Brian Hampson, PhD, co-founder of the Australian Brumby Research Unit at the University of Queensland, Australis, presented the results of a study that looked at the effects of four trimming models on hoof morphology (form and structure).

Study Overview

In his study, Hampson evaluated 22 horses from the United States and Germany on which one of four trim types were performed over a 12-month period. His goal was to document morphologic changes associated with various barefoot hoof care models and to determine if hoof capsule changes occurred in relation to trimming philosophies. He also aimed to find out if the palmar soft-tissue volume within the foot changed over 12 months. He didn’t seek to determine if one trim method was better than another

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Written by:

Sarah Evers Conrad has a bachelor’s of arts in journalism and equine science from Western Kentucky University. As a lifelong horse lover and equestrian, Conrad started her career at The Horse: Your Guide to Equine Health Care magazine. She has also worked for the United States Equestrian Federation as the managing editor of Equestrian magazine and director of e-communications and served as content manager/travel writer for a Caribbean travel agency. When she isn’t freelancing, Conrad spends her free time enjoying her family, reading, practicing photography, traveling, crocheting, and being around animals in her Lexington, Kentucky, home.

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