Digestive System

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Genome Sequenced

Japanese scientists recently announced that they have sequenced the genome of Clostridium perfringens. The organism can cause diarrhea, scours, and other intestinal problems in horses. Clostridia are normally found in various environments

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Equine Digestive Physiology

An understanding of the horses’ digestive tract, where feedstuffs are digested and how that impacts the end products of digestion, is necessary to help the horse meet these challenges. The digestive tract of the horse is divided into two sections

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The Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract

Then there is the matter of the large colon, with its sacculated construction that seems made to order for twisting or strangulating when the pouches become distended by gas during a bout with colic.

There is also the matter of length. If

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Probiotics and Digestive Aids: Microbes to the Rescue

While the horse receives the bulk of the nutrients as his food is broken down, he’s not the only one who benefits; the microbes take their share and thus maintain their populations. Their presence is essential to the horse, who could not digest fiber

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Digestion From Start To Finish

Although it is not necessary for you to become bogged down in the intricacies of equine digestive physiology, a basic understanding of how the horse digests feed is necessary for the selection of appropriate diets and feeding practices.

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Choke (Esophageal Obstruction)

The word choke for me conjures up images of someone hovering over a table, unable to talk or breathe because a piece of food has lodged in their trachea or windpipe–fortunately, the Heimlich maneuver usually rectifies the situation. Choke is

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Fat Burning

For the most part, the word fat has bad connotations in our society today–fat often is used to describe an overweight or obese state. When we think of dietary fat and the proportion of calories in our diet that is derived from various sources”P>For the most part, the word fat has bad connotations in our society today–fat often is used to describe an overweight or obese state. When we think of dietary fat and the proportion of calories in our diet that “>For the most part, the word fat has bad connotations in our society today–fat often is used to describe an overweight or obese state. When we think of dietary fat and the proportion”For the most part, the word fat has bad connotations in our society today–fat often is used to describe an overweight or obese state. When we think of d”or the most part, the word fat has bad connotations in our society today–fat often is used to describe an overweight or obe”r the most part, the word fat has bad connotations in our society today–fat often is used to de” the most part, the word fat has bad connotations in our society toda”the most part, the word fat has bad connota”he most part, the wo

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Horses and Humans: Eating For Two

Equines are obligate herbivores, meaning they are designed to eat plants and only plants; they’re not equipped to eat or to digest animal flesh. Humans, on the other hand, are true omnivores, meaning we’ll eat practically anything.

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Feeding Horses Cattle Feed: Just Ruminating

On the surface, cattle feeds might look like an appropriate choice for your horses, but nutritionally, there are a number of important differences. They have major digestive and metabolic differences that make their dietary needs quite diverse.

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