NASC Announces Preferred Supplier Program

This program designates companies that provide raw materials to those that manufacture and distribute products.
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The National Animal Supplement Council (NASC) has developed a preferred supplier program, which designates companies that provide raw materials to those that manufacture and distribute products under their own name. This helps manage the entire process from the very beginning to the end and the finished product, the council said.

The NASC says it helps supplement brands effectively navigate the maze of both federal and state regulations and requirements governing pet supplement companies. Membership in NASC is designed to provide animal supplement providers access to regulatory guidance and in turn displays a commitment of quality that earns the trust of caring animal owners and consumers.

“By joining NASC, supplement companies are engaging in a process of continuous improvement by committing themselves to quality, continuous monitoring, and furthering research in order to enhance the well-being of animals around the globe,” said NASC President Bill Bookout. “Furthermore, animal health supplement suppliers can turn to NASC as a resource to help their dog, cat, and equine brands display their commitment to quality with the NASC seal. Any company that displays the NASC Quality Seal has passed a thorough and comprehensive quality audit providing consumers a higher degree of confidence in the products they select.”

The presence of the seal of quality on animal supplements indicates to consumers that the product is continuously monitored and its manufacturer complies with high quality standards, as determined by the NASC. The seal highlights products from companies that have successfully completed a facility audit for implementation of specific written standards

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