NTRA Safety and Integrity Alliance Reaccredits Finger Lakes

The New York track received “best practice” grading in the area of aftercare and transition of retired racehorses.
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The National Thoroughbred Racing Association (NTRA) has announced that Finger Lakes Gaming & Racetrack has earned reaccreditation from the NTRA Safety and Integrity Alliance. Located in Farmington, New York, near Rochester and Lake Ontario on the western side of the state, the 53-year-old track opened its live racing season last week.

Finger Lakes has been continuously accredited by the Alliance since 2011 and, once again, the alliance accreditation inspection team gave the Finger Lakes Thoroughbred Adoption Program (FLTAP) a “best practice” grading in the area of aftercare and transition of retired racehorses, noting that the FLTAP is one of the best Thoroughbred aftercare programs in the nation.

“Assuring safe retirements and second careers for horses racing at accredited racetracks has always been a critical component of the Alliance code of standards,” said Alex Waldrop, NTRA president and CEO. “Finger Lakes’ adoption program stands out as a racing operation that understands the important role that aftercare and transition of retired racehorses plays in the overall safety of their racing operation.”

Behind the Scenes at the Finger Lakes Thoroughbred Adoption Program

The FLTAP was ahead of its time when it was founded in 2005. In the ensuing 10 years, the rest of the industry has made great strides addressing the need for aftercare of its retired racehorses. A number of track, many of which were motivated by the alliance accreditation process, have developed and funded their own retirement programs, while the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance (TAA) has established a high standard of care and is providing sustainable funding to retirement programs that comply with these standards. Still, FLTAP remains an excellent example of how tracks and horsemen can work together to safely transition retired Thoroughbreds

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