Blodgett Appointed to AHC Board

Glenn Blodgett, DVM, is also the current president of the American Quarter Horse Association.
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Glenn Blodgett, DVM, of Guthrie, Texas has been elected to the American Horse Council’s (AHC) Board of Trustees. Blodgett is the current president of the American Quarter Horse Association.

“The work of the American Horse Council is crucial to the future of the equine industry,” said Blodgett. “The AQHA has been actively involved with the American Horse Council since its formation in 1969, and together we’ve made a considerable impact when it comes to equine matters in Washington. I am honored to serve as an AHC trustee and continue our work to ensure the horse industry is represented properly. I look forward to working with others in the industry to make sure the wellbeing of all horses and horsemen remains a priority.”

Blodgett became an AQHA director in 1991, and in 2011, he elevated to director-at-large. He served on the AQHA Stud Book and Registration Committee and as its chairman; on the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame Selection Committee; and on the American Quarter Horse Foundation, AQHA Ranching, and Marketing and Membership councils.

Blodgett received his bachelor’s degree in animal science from Oklahoma State University and earned his degree in veterinary medicine from Texas A&M University, and has since been recognized as an outstanding alumnus by both universities

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