Anhidrosis Seminar Scheduled for May

Horse can develop anhidrosis, or non-sweating, at any point in their life, regardless of breed, age, or sex. Horses living in hot and humid climates are known to be at greater risk. The Sanctuary Equine Sports Therapy & Rehabilitation Center, located
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Horse can develop anhidrosis, or non-sweating, at any point in their life, regardless of breed, age, or sex. Horses living in hot and humid climates are known to be at greater risk. The Sanctuary Equine Sports Therapy & Rehabilitation Center, located in Ocala, Fla., will be hosting an informative seminar entitled "Anhidrosis: Getting Through The Summer" on May 24.

"The University of Florida (UF) is currently conducting a clinical trial on non-sweaters, and if anyone is interested in participating we encourage them to join us for this seminar," said Brenda McDuffee, general manager of The Sanctuary. "Non-sweating can happen to any horse especially those living in hot climates. Exercise, stress or excessive weight can be a factor, and we encourage everyone who has questions about non-sweating to attend."

The seminar will feature Martha Mallicote, DVM, a large animal medicine at the UF. She has worked in both ambulatory and referral hospital settings, including an internal medicine fellowship at Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital in Lexington, Ky. Her clinical and research interests include endocrine/metabolic disease, neonatology, and infectious disease.

The seminar will begin with refreshments at 5:30 p.m. and then Mallicote will discuss non-sweating and how to manage it starting at 5:45 pm. A question and answer session will follow the seminar

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