Readers Respond: Nom Nom Nom

Nearly 1,700 readers of TheHorse.com responded to a poll asking, “Do your horses chew on your fences, stalls, barn, etc.?”

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Nearly 1,700 readers of TheHorse.com responded to a poll asking, “Do your horses chew on your fences, stalls, barn, etc.?”






results of poll on measuring horses' feed

Results were as follows: 

  • Yes: 59.59% (997)
  • No: 40.41% (676)

Readers shared their tips on how to prevent chewing in the comments below.

Results of weekly polls from TheHorse.com are published in The Horse Health E-Newsletter. Published every week, this e-newsletter offers news on diseases, veterinary research, health events, and in-depth articles on common equine health conditions and what you can do to recognize, avoid, or treat them. Sign up for our e-newsletters using the form above or on our e-newsletter page.  

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  • Horses that are bored are likely to develop bad habits.
  • Using a Barclay’s collar. Fantastic
  • I reduced sugar intake & stopped feeding sweet feed
  • In the winter, this winter, I fed same supplements, as during summer competition, they didn’t chew wood
  • One word “McNasty” worked like a charm for us.
  • Bitterlicks
  • Mix cayenne with molasses and smear on wood
  • Pasture living; lots of exercise. Both reduce the boredom/anxiety that bring on this so-called vice.
  • Have no
  • They never get a chance–I wont have them around!
  • Termites aren’t they
  • Electric wire on the boards keep them away from the fence
  • Keeping active minds with training and plenty of room to roam.
  • Hay!
  • I leave a bale of straw out in the pasture to chew on, seems to help
  • Trees – bored yearlings need to get in bigger pasture!
  • Pepper spray on the things they are chewing the saliva reactivates the spray leaving a nasty taste
  • My horse loves her feed bucket. I remove it to prevent having to buy another one!
  • Only when bored
  • Collar
  • My quarter horse only nibbles, and if I fuss at him he stops immediately
  • Put fresh Sears white paint on the fence. This has worked for me for years. Wherever I see them s
  • REPLACE AS MUCH WOOD WITH METAL AS POSSIBLE
  • I have one TB that does this when he’s bored
  • A device called the TINGLER available in Ireland that prevents this in gentlest manner
  • Boredom is the main cause. Give them something to do
  • Maximum turnout is the best prevention/cure.
  • Electric
  • Treat them for ulcers
  • Free choice decent quality hay
  • Hot wire and nothing at cribbing height
  • Pipe fencing- metal edges on barn doors. Chew stop painted on wood panels
  • I have had many, many horses over the course of 40 yrs and never had one that chewed on anything. We
  • All I can say is linseed oil that slows ’em down!!
  • on trees only
  • provide ample ‘chewing time’ grazing/hay/plenty of pasture per horse.
  • We feed a free choice mineral and turn them out in the pasture often
  • feed hay 3 to 4 times a day
  • free choice hay
  • My barn was built to deter chewing; turned out a lot so not bored
  • spend more time entertaining them
  • provide mineral/salt blocks, exercise
  • They chew on trees, but Halt Cribbing helps if applied 1 or 2 times a year.
  • spray everything with McNasty, it works!
  • Yippee! Of course this comes with 24-7 turnout!
  • He used to, when he was stalled all the time. I am convinced he chewed out of boredom.
  • only way to prevent is steel piping fence and box metal in the stalls.
  • barbed wire
  • Only one. Supplemented, but no help.
  • Horse do naughty things when they don’t have enough to do–turn them out!
  • Since I started adding MICRO-MINERALS I’ve had no problem.
  • I have tried, French cribbing collar, miracle collar, chew stop, paint and sprays, nothing works
  • we use metal almost everywhere, and wood is coated in tar basised stop chew
  • mix cayenne paper with vegetable oil and paint on fences
  • Pastes of pepper and peanut butter/sticky edibles on corners/edges discourages chewing. Dogs too!
  • free choice grass hay, company, and activity
  • build metal piping stalls
  • rub a bar of Irish Spring body soap on fence areas and horses will stay clear…it really works!
  • Pipe corrals
  • less stall time – more paddock time
  • But only where the garlic catches on the stall. They love it and mostly lick it and then bite the wood
  • pipe fences and concrete stalls
  • we use “no chew” spray
  • no sorry
  • I have tried every product on the market and some that were home made.
  • keep them enough salt
  • Electric wire on pasture fences
  • tried everything, had to put fence over all accessible wood.
  • feed them more hay, they are hungry. My horse given adequate hay has never chewed
  • Have tried everything and given up. Replace wood.
  • I have 16 horses about 3 are wood chewing.
  • A couple of trees were stripped last year, but nothing else – we have pipe fencing
  • Trees! They are beavers, and this started only with the hay shortage as we cannot feed free choice.
  • I provide plenty of hay at all times to satisfy their need to chew
  • out on 35 acres of pasture 24/7
  • A horse that is content and happy doesn’t need to entertain himself or find food.
  • feed more hay
  • Paint/ spray a special bad tasting paint onto everything- they hate the taste so are discouraged!
  • Feeding Quitt has been a true solution.
  • Put metal over boards
  • Wrapping non-climb fencing around trees saved them. I screwed 1 1/2 inch angle iron to every corner
  • our weanlings chew on an old board fence
  • They chew when they are bored
  • Absolutely recommend hotwire on board fence, which prevents chewing as well as challenging the fence
  • big pasture to forage/roam
  • Lessen time in stalls; provide interesting activities, toys; pasture time
  • I have tried every thing except the cribbing collar or a muzzle to keep my standardbred from chewing
  • Chew stop painted many places; some horses better when on pasture
  • plenty of hay, loose mineral/salt always available. Dewormed regularly, teeth work done yearly.
  • Metal corner strips on everything possible.
  • Ivory dish soap and cayenne pepper
  • Irish Spring soap rubbed on the wood.
  • Keeping a horse from getting bored and feeding minerals and carrots, as a tasty treat!
  • Keep them from being bored or stressed. Your vet can rule out any medical problems with an exam.
  • keep them turned out
  • Electric wire along the area chewed helps at my farm.
  • Chew stop spray
  • Keep plenty of hay in front of them and keep them busy.
  • out of boredom in the long winter months
  • Not any more. We changed fencing to a metal fencing , no more chewing.
  • plastic drywall corners secured to wood
  • Barn and fence is galvanized steel, common in Arizona
  • I put plastic garden containers over the fence posts – that is working.
  • Quitt and lots of hay in the stall
  • never had that problem
  • Our two mares chew the bark off the trees.
  • horses tend to chew wood and eat dirt when they are missing minerals, offer a loose salt/mineral sup
  • use paint on products on market
  • 1 out of 6 chews. Turn out more. use metal flashing on doors and elect. wire.
  • cover all wood edges with mesh or corner beading
  • Occasionally a nibble on the barn door – I think it is when they want in for grain
  • My Mare chews the fence only when she is annoyed she has taught my gelding to do too sharing is fun
  • use a mixture of different hot sauces then heat them up before you apply it.
  • used motor oil
  • Every time I see Casper chewing on something I do not go and get a treat 4 him at the end of the day.
  • Only when they are in more than they are used to. Otherwise no.
  • miracle collar works!
  • bitter spray
  • As much paddock time as possible!
  • but they do lean on the non-barbed wire portions of my fence and mess it up.
  • The horses live in a herd situation, are out 24/7 on a variety of surfaces and they have many obstacles
  • I put branches in the pens for them to chew on and they leave the fences alone, electric fences help
  • Keep them busy, engaged, and entertained.
  • I try to keep them close together so they can talk to each other
  • not too bad though
  • We ran electric line and use a solar charger . We solved it that way and have no more issues
  • Only when not ridden for a few days
  • providing mineral blocks
  • It helps to cut poplar limbs & place them in the paddocks, this keeps them off the barn & fence.
  • I paint the wood with Pine Sol – works well than anything I have tried
  • Apply a non-chewing product on fences.
  • only when stalled for long periods
  • placing PVC piping on top rail made them stop
  • Use Quit by Farnam!
  • preventing boredom is the best way to curb chewing
  • We paint all wood with Chew Halt. It works great.
  • Lots of turn out, constant access to hay and test for ulcers
  • Add apple cider vinegar to feed
  • give them likit treats and toys
  • All surfaces must be flat and hard to grip. Use electric fencing in the field on rails
  • they have plenty of turnout time with other horses
  • Turnout 24/7.
  • used motor oil & black pepper painted over the chewed area.
  • Hay plus pasyure to keep them busy
  • cheep dish liquid soap
  • I try to keep them outdoors as much as possible, but when it’s wet, they’re in. Just bored!
  • My 2 horses do not chew on their stalls
  • Let them have all the first cutting hay that they want.
  • Irish spring soap does well until the next rain
  • Snug fit Miracle Collar
  • It’s best to get a cribbing collar for your horse if he cribs
  • PCV pipe on all top edges… my biggest beavers don’t like it
  • one 4yr old filly started chewing her stall. no others in the heard chew
  • They practically ate the barn down when it was new, they don’t chew much anymore
  • boredom toys, my horses love them!!!
  • they all chew the trees!!
  • chicken wire around trees
  • paint with creosote
  • Just like a termite
  • My donkeys are beavers in disguise.
  • cribbing collar-nutcracker type
  • give them a toy to play with
  • dish soap painted on surface
  • cayenne, red Chile flakes and habanera sauce, mix thick like a paste and spread on wood
  • I try to keep them in pasture as much as possible
  • cayenne pepper paste and electric fencing wire
  • We have put up horse mesh fence & wrapped it around the top board to prevent chewing
  • slather Halt Cribbing on everything chewable
  • Leon doesn’t usually crib, just a little in the pasture when his buddies are.
  • Feed enough forage /fiber and they will not chew
  • Lots of good hay in winter and toys in the field
  • She has maximum time outside to keep her mentally healthy.
  • Cribbing Strip
  • No, but only because we have worked hard to make them unpalatable
  • I painted mine and it detoured him for a while
  • Metal instead of wood
  • Miss Lillie is 3/4 TB and 1/4 beaver-got thru 12 x2 overnite once
  • proper feeding-free choice quality hay, alfalfa pellets, high fiber, low starch diets,plenty of t/o
  • feed more haythey are at liberty to walk in and out of their stable when they want to
    trees!
  • Not w whole lot, but sometimes, probably if bored
  • Bitter Apple spray
  • split her food portions into 4 feedings/day instead of 2
  • my horses chew each others blankets in the winter. I use bitter apple reappling after rain
  • he bites the pipe corrals
  • Weavers Cribbing Collar works the best, but you have to remove it regularly so they don’t get sores
  • extra hay and turn out time
  • Electric fencing and horses are kept occupied by being out side as long as up to 16hrs in summer.
  • Recently replaced boards, painted, and added a hot wire. No chewing yet.
  • Hay, free choice, or in one (or two) of those nylon haynets from Dover that have tiny openings.
  • nope, lucky me
  • Lucky us! No cribbers!!!
  • In stalls only if not allowed turn out – electric pasture fence keeps them off
  • Not until a visiting horse showed them. Chew stop works, but is ugly, clear does not work!
  • Dycosote. It’s USDA approved, non-carcinogenic and will work on most chewers!
  • They are too busy eating grass
  • yes, yes, yes, help – help – what can I do to stop this habit
  • mine have plenty of room and never spend time in a stallOne chews, not cribs, after she is given a treat. Others chew in winter a bit
  • paint boards with a mixture of hot chilli peppers
  • 4 years ago I started adding Nutrena Rocky Mountain Minerals they are happy and content.
  • electricfences stop chewing, plenty of grass & hay gives their mouths stuff to do, no barns for us.
  • Make sure they have plenty of turnout time so they’re happy & have interesting things to do.
  • Chew Stop (the natural cinnamon kind) works great for a low level offender 🙂
  • Only rarely
  • I have one wind sucker off the track– terrible habit and was not disclosed to me when I purchased.
  • Absolutely!!! And not just when confined. I think a couple of them are part beaver!
  • If they start I apply Crisco and then tabasco which they hate and quit the habit quickly
  • I have polyurethan fences.
  • Turn him out with a friend
  • My filly likes the trees more.
  • Give them a block of wood
  • The product, Halt Cribbing, is the only thing that stops mine from wood-chewing.
  • HAVEN’T YET FOUND ANYTHING TO DETOUR CRIBBING
  • Only one chews. Two lick. The rest are fine. No suggestions have made a difference.
  • No, but 2 horses in the barn do. 1 with collar does well, 1 without cribs and chews constantly
  • In 45 yrs I never had a wood chew or a weaver. Horses get all day turnout.
  • Doesn’t do it on pipe corral stall walls, but will play with wooden wheelbarrow handles or stalls.
  • No, because they are turned out 24/7 in big pastures
  • 24 hour access to turnout except in extreme weather.
  • this year it has been horable, not sure why they are chewing. they never have in the past
  • Quitt helps a little
  • 1 part palmolive dish soap, 2 parts water, 1/4 part very hot pepper powder
  • Bored horses need something to do. If they lack room to roam or companions to play with, they become
  • Letting her out and keeping her in regular exercise normally stops the chewing.
  • Only if stalled up
  • no matter how much pasture, they always seem to prefer to eat the barn … aluminum caps where feas
  • 3 cribbers and all others chew wood no solution found
  • QUITT worked for awhile, but is no longer effective.
  • they are well fed, but boredom makes them behave like beavers
  • Horses crib because of stomach pains. They can’t belch-this is what they do. Change feed.
  • cover stall surfaces with metal, electric fencing outside
  • Your horse does this because he is bored, so buy him a toy or put an item over his mouth to prevent
  • I use Oak wood in my barn and as rails for my fencing. Jolly Balls are good for boredom.
  • Thank goodness we’ve never had a problem
  • used motor oil–make sure there is no antifreeze accidentally mixed in and paint it on th wood.
  • youngster just started doing it, I’m hoping it’s teething I use treated wood wher possible and coat
  • horses in open field with lean to shed for shelter and are happy healthy horses
  • They do chew branches and treew some especially in the early spring.
  • If it’s made of wood, any wood, they eat it.
  • Only one does & only at feeding time. He does it in his stall waiting for his grain.
  • I miss creosote which was cheap and worked well to discourage chewing
  • Don’t let them get bored!!
  • Correction with a rub on the nose worked for me.
  • Our horses are in run in stables, so don’t need to get bored. There are also lots of trees around.
  • NO … but she’s only 4 …
  • Bitter apple keeps him off.
  • extreme chewing wood, metal, 24 hr t/o, hay 3-5 x day
  • muzzle while in the stall and hotwire top of boards
  • turn them out sometimes. Often they only do these things because they’re bored
  • My horse cribs or windsucks. I even find him eating bark when hes bored!
  • My horse are out most of the day to prevent boredom
  • When left alone to long,bored and weather stress
  • Physical barrier – heavy wire hog or Del Mar panels over vulnerable spots in pens.
  • He chews his door even when he’s outside as we never shut them in. Maybe just teething.
  • He chews his door even when he’s outside as we never shut them in. Maybe just teething.
  • Use metal building and fencing materials.
  • Concrete Barn w/metal stall doors/bars-they chew buckets instead 🙂
  • Pasture turnout and carboleneum paint on the paddock fences
  • Lots of turnout, adequate roughage in feed, play toys if stalled; youngsters will always chew!
  • I leave branches, tree trunks etc for additional forage.
  • never bored and not lacking the minerals that they sometimes search for
  • lots of turnout as well as hay in front of them at least 70 to 80% of the time.
  • Anything wooden, even with QuittWindsucking collars, chilli paste spread on fences
  • and trees., too!!
  • Make sure that they have free choice to grass hay, free choice vitamins and minerals
  • unless its excessive i don’t worry about it.
  • keep them busy eating hay and grass. Some still seem to need to put everything within reach in their
  • Only a few on their stalls
  • cayenne mixed with hot sauce, painted on wood!
  • When board
  • Modern horses are a GMO….too much beaver DNA has been spliced in!!!
  • I’ll take any info I can get because nothing works
  • Paint the wood with hot sauce and baby oil
  • 1 mule doesn’t. the other is a termite and nothing dissuades her.
  • So far, I have only a licker in my four. He does this after eating his oat mix.
  • hot wire on fences, metal capping on stalls, play things to lessen boredom, free hay for munchers
  • original scent Ben Gay rubbed into wood is a great preventative.
  • high quality feed and hay at all times with 12-14 hours of turnout avoid this habit
  • shock collar
  • Increase turnout time in a pasture with grass
  • Some do. I cover it with steel angle iron when I can. Keeping cribbers in the pasture helps too.
  • 24 x 7 pasture turn out.
  • Digestive enzymes have helped
  • They keep busy with lots of hay.
  • red pepper and oil soak my wood, don’t rub your eyes after touching my fences….!!!!!
  • if your horse chews on wood he may need more fiber in his diet,
  • ciyane pepper mixed w/Vaseline
  • I have a Castle Brook Barn and none of our horses chew on it as there is nothing for them to chew.
  • I paint all my wooden fences with sump oil that stop’s them.
  • most is metak stall walls are the only wood
  • The one cribber I have improved markedly when I put him on UlcerGard for a month.
  • electric wire around top
  • Keep them fed properly and busy.
  • Keep them outside 24/7 with access to shelter.
  • Eliminate all wood and make sure your horse gets a lot of work so boredom is minimal.
  • brush motor oil on the wood
  • i HAVE BEEN VERY SUCCESSFUL WITH CHEWING BY COVERING THE EDGE OF BOARDS WITH GYP ROCK CORNER BEADING
  • vinyl fencing! I love it.
  • He stays outside 24 x 7, electric fencing, lots of hay, a friend to play with :o)
  • Sump Oil
  • Also trees. Avoid treated timber in construction as poisonous to horses.
  • Provide a non-poisonus tree limb in the pasture for them to chew on, poplar works well.
  • she used to chew constantly before I pput her on 24/7 turnout.
  • But the chew the heck out of trees.
  • use “Quit”
  • An electric wire on the top of the board/pole
  • use pipe fences. also the product Quitt seems to help.
  • a confined stallion chews; the others do not.
  • move horse to stall with metal rails
  • hay available 24/7
  • i put corrogated drain pipe split down one side and stretch over the sides of my water trough
  • Rub fences with soap
  • make sure they have mineral salt and use a grazing muzzle on the “beaver”
  • Aluminum angle on corners and edges!
  • I have tried sprays, toys…I think my horse is part beaver!!
  • no, they get tournout 24-7 yearround there never that bored
  • my stable won’t feed enough hay, I am leaving.
  • we put sheetrock corner beading on all the edges of the wood, it’s metal!
  • They’re beavers regardless of stall toys, lots of turnout in big padocks, free choice hay when in.
  • I use Moorman’s Grostrong mineral.
  • if your horse chews he is probobly mineral deficient
  • I have smeared softened Irish Spring soap on favorite chewing areas.
  • Plenty of turn-out time!!!
  • Occasionally on the barn (wood). I spray it with a stop chew product and they will stop for awhile
  • Foal teething
  • All fences have hot wire across the top and all corners in the stalls have aluminum channel attached
  • hot wire and electric fencing
  • and trees, saddles, bridles, basicaly anything he can get his mouth on
  • give them lots of turnout & a hay based diet
  • Colorless crib halt applied to wood works well
  • NO!
  • one is a cribber but I have one that exhibits pica as well if he is left in the stall too much
  • Electric Fence,( run it around top of all wood fences.)
  • they have plenty to keep them busy
  • paint everything with mcnasty!
  • broke them of it with homemade cayenne pepper sol.
  • I use mix hot cheyene pepper with chew stop or oil.
  • feed them often and give them plenty of pasture time so they don’t get bored
  • so far, no Sprays or paint ons have worked… neither does mineral/vitamin supplementing
  • only the babies
  • My mare doesn’t, but there are plenty of horses at our barn that do.
  • Put PVC pipe around wood,stops it.
  • Have wooden planks in 2 spots on the fence line. Only thing they are chewing on though,
  • tobasco sauce works too, unless they like it
  • they chew on the stall boards
  • NOTHING WORKED with my mare, except for the ‘Quitt’ supplement.
  • on pasture 24 -7
  • turnout, turnout, turnout
  • i have used hot sauce on the tops of stall boards with success.
  • creosote treated lumber
  • One did, out of anxiety I think, when we first got him, but he stopped when he got acclimated
  • a boarded horse!!
  • I’ve started calling my new colt a beaver, as he chews on everything from round pens to trees! ahhh
  • lots of hay!
  • Hot pepper sauce mixed with cooking oil and sprayed onto wood surfaces!
  • 24×24 pipe stall and horse that gets regular exercise
  • Rap Last or No Chew & if that d/n work; metal covers over exposed wood.
  • covering barn joists and stall edges with rubber flooring or carpet
  • I have a metal Barnmaster barn and Electrobraid on the top rail of my wood fence.
  • The only wood they chew on are the mesquite trees. Why??????
  • All the TIME!
  • The best deterent was Creosote.
  • Wood and other areas are covered with a heavy diamond wire mesh. Outside fences with electric fence.
  • I only stall in severe weather, use Chewstop or other inhibitors
  • keep them occupied and happy with enough hay for foragel
  • only in the spring..bar soap helps stop them from chewing. They get hay 5 x a day as well.
  • because he was not getting enough forage and had developed an ulcers.
  • Toys! Cones, exercise balls, basket balls, rubber tubs, anything to play w/to stop chewing my barn.
  • hay pellets, lotsof fiber
  • cover wood with metal U profiles/strips where possible
  • Only during the winter when the weather is bad and they only go out for a few hours each day.
  • Rebuild with oak instead of pine or other soft wood. Quit helps some, but not all.
  • used to chew wood at old barn. New barn is concrete with PVC fence and I provide hay or grass 24/7
  • They have always been good horses. I spend a lot of time with them.
  • Lots of pasture time
  • One never does, one always does and one only sometimes
  • I toss a polar log into the paddocks when they are really chewing a lot
  • Using rails instead of planks helps, and hotwiring top of fence
  • 24/7 turnout may help; they do rub and scratch on posts, tho’
  • electric fence
  • No horse should be kept in a stall. Happy horses don’t chew!!!
  • I give them more exercise and vary their schedules on feeding, training, trail riding .
  • They use the fences to itch and itch and itch.
  • more exercise alleviates boredom chewing
  • I do have 1 that runs her teeth up stall bars.
  • Why do people think horses stop chewing by taking off cribbing collars? They don’t! They do it more!
  • I use chew stop if they start. Another thing that works is hot pepper sauce.
  • Miracle collar, works wonders
  • Some yes, some no. Mostly if they are bored
  • Usually only in the winter, when they start to get board outside.
  • electric fence!
  • I make sure they get hay 3x a day. There is a mini that will “eat” the fence. Her hay is restricted
  • Proper nutrition is key, keep them busy, turn them out so they are not bored!!!!
  • One of my two only chew the bark on our trees
  • I Hope You Have an answer.
  • Paint with Rainmaker and have hay in stall to stop “self-medicating”
  • eletric fence……….
  • Running a hot wire and covering wood with tin helps some
  • Just on the truck if they get too it.
  • HAY — but there has been such a shortage we’ve had to feed complete feed and then they’re bored!!!
  • I used electric fence wire to keep them off the wooden shelter that shades their water trough
  • only chews out of boredom in stall, so keep him out as much as possible.
  • Ace has toys. And he will make toys out of anything he can get hold of.
  • One cribber, one chewer, one nibbler, four nothing
  • Less boredom! Minimize confinement and maximize freedom in pastures. Coarse hay.
  • Put homemade horseradish on it! Stopped that.
  • Pipe fences and metal barns
  • not so much in the barn, but outside they eat the rails and shelter for lunch!
  • This winter was especially bad
  • Quitt works great. It is a feed through product.
  • diesel mixed with cayenne pepper, painted on
  • NOT BARN KEPT. FREE PASTURE AND RUN-IN SHED. HEALTHIER ENVIRONMENT FOR BODY AND MIND. NO CRIBBING.
  • I call them BEAVER’S!!
  • My horse never had the predisposition to chew.
  • They have access to hay/pasture 24/7 and get mineral but still persist in gnawing wood.
  • There is a spray called McNasty that WORKS, but take care not to breathe it in.
  • Sometimes. It seems to be more when the weather is bad and they are bored.
  • Plenty of pasture turnout with other horses. Less stress happier in a herd.
  • They do not wind suck but like to chew. I have resorted to giving them untreated lumber to chew on.
  • Unfortunately I have no tips, but I would like to find out how other owners deal with this situation
  • We have flashing installed on top edges in stall, hot wire on board fences
  • balanced diet is very important
  • Lots of toys
  • they eat the hawthorn & fir tree limbs
  • Only during winter when forage is limited to twice daily feeding
  • 24/7 pasture
  • I keep them in pasture, exercised and their minds busy.when bored
  • put metal on edges where possible
  • She chews when she is missing a vtitamin or mineral so I increase Grow N Win and she stops it!
  • decreased hay rations have led to chewing this year; feed more hay
  • I put lemon dishwashing liquid on the fences and now they have stopped chewing.
  • I use brown crib halt
  • My horse thinks he’s a beaver!
  • Metal corner moldings wherever they will fit.
  • hot wire
  • My three and a half yr old filly learned to crib very early on. I use a neck sweat, works!
  • I have one who cribs
  • Make sure they have plenty of roughage.
  • Spraying “McNasty” once a week seems to help.
  • they’re outside and not bored so they don’t chew
  • when I get horses that bear the wood, I cut 3-4 ft. lenghts of poplar or willow and toss in paddock.
  • They can’t chew — we use pipe corrals and barns
  • miracle collar
  • He eats bark off trees,other horses’ tails & anything he can get his teeth on(he’s out on pasture)
  • I have a 31 yo cribber – all agree cribbing keeps him young at heart – go figure
  • The barn, the fences… I’m glad I don’t have a wooden leg.
  • I don’t have horses, I have 4-legged, 1,200-pound termites.
  • At least one thing that has not happened YET !!!!
  • A bar of soap rubbed on the fence or stall door is effective–it tastes bad but won’t hurt them

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Megan Arszman received a Bachelor of Science In print journalism and equine science from Murray State University in Murray, Ky., and loves combining her love of horses, photography, and writing. In her “free time,” when she’s not busy working as a horse show secretary or riding her American Quarter Horses on her parents’ Indiana farm, she’s training and competing her Pembroke Welsh Corgi and Swedish Vallhund in dog agility and running.

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