Researchers Link Gene Mutation to All Gaited Breeds

A horse’s ability to perform gaits such as ambling and pacing comes down primarily to one particular mutated gene: the so-called Gait Keeper gene.
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Did you hear the one about the suave Saddlebred stallion who wanted to impress a herd of mares?

He just ambled on by.

We now know that our suave Saddlebred stallion likely has the “Gait Keeper” gene in his chromosomes.

Recent study results from an international group of researchers indicate that a horse’s ability to have gaits such as ambling and pacing comes down primarily to one particular mutated gene: the so-called Gait Keeper gene

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Passionate about horses and science from the time she was riding her first Shetland Pony in Texas, Christa Lesté-Lasserre writes about scientific research that contributes to a better understanding of all equids. After undergrad studies in science, journalism, and literature, she received a master’s degree in creative writing. Now based in France, she aims to present the most fascinating aspect of equine science: the story it creates. Follow Lesté-Lasserre on Twitter @christalestelas.

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