Horse Reproduction Trends And Tools

Whether reproduction occurs through natural breeding or artificial insemination, techniques and tools exist to help mare and stallion owners achieve their final goal: a complication-free conception, a problem-free pregnancy, and a healthy foal. When fertility problems occur, a veterinarian with a specialty in equine reproduction can help provide the tools to ensure breeding success.
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A successful breeding calls for the latest gadgets and technology.

Whether reproduction occurs through natural breeding or artificial insemination, techniques and tools exist to help mare and stallion owners achieve their final goal: a complication-free conception, a problem-free pregnancy, and a healthy foal. A successful one-time breeding is the best scenario; however, Mother Nature often has other plans. When fertility problems occur, a veterinarian with a specialty in equine reproduction can help provide the tools–both high- and low-tech–to ensure breeding success.

On the Mare Side …

Inducing Ovulation Regardless of breeding method, inseminating the mare only once during her estrous cycle is ideal. Because there is a very limited window of time for insemination, the mare must be ready (ovulating) at the same time that the stallion is available. "The only way to effectively do this is to induce ovulation," says Ed Squires, DVM, MS, PhD, Dipl. ACT, executive director of the University of Kentucky's Gluck Equine Research Foundation. To induce ovulation, veterinarians can inject the mare with deslorelin, a synthetic hormone that stimulates the development of the ovarian follicle and release of the oocyte (egg)

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Written by:

Nancy Zacks holds an M.S. in Science Journalism from the Boston University College of Communication. She grew up in suburban Philadelphia where she learned to ride over fields and fences in nearby Malvern, Pa. When not writing, she enjoys riding at an eventing barn, drawing and painting horses, volunteering at a therapeutic riding program, and walking with Lilly, her black Labrador Retriever.

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