Midway College Offers Equine Therapy Degree

Midway College, located in Midway, Kentucky, in the heart of Bluegrass horse country, recently added the only bachelor’s degree program in equine therapy in the United States to its curriculum. This degree program offers students the chance to

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Midway College, located in Midway, Kentucky, in the heart of Bluegrass horse country, recently added the only bachelor’s degree program in equine therapy in the United States to its curriculum. This degree program offers students the chance to acquire the skills and certification needed to work in the rapidly growing regional horse industry and as equine therapists around the world.


The Equine Therapy program, which is open to women, is a professional degree program in which students must complete 65 hours of pre-equine therapy courses before making formal application into the professional phase of the program. The professional courses will stress practical experience and include clinicals under the supervision of practicing therapists and veterinarians. Students will acquire skills in equine sports therapy, rehabilitation, and injury prevention. Upon completion of the course work, students will take a certification examination administered by the college.


Therapy for horses involves the use of non-invasive techniques for rehabilitation and injury prevention. Treatment involves the use of therapeutic lasers, photon therapy, electrical stimulation, magnetic therapy, therapeutic ultrasound, rehabilitative exercise and stretching, massage and other manual therapies, hydrotherapy, and application of heat and cold. Equine therapy is considered secondary care for the horse and is applied only after a thorough veterinary examination and diagnosis.


“The addition of our four-year equine therapy program is a natural extension of the nationally recognized Midway College equine studies programs,” said Director of Equine Therapy, Mimi Porter, “Employment opportunities are numerous. From both a student and horse industry standpoint, this is a `win-win’ situation

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The Horse: Your Guide To Equine Health Care is an equine publication providing the latest news and information on the health, care, welfare, and management of all equids.

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