Do You Have a Head Case for an MRI Study?”o You Have a Head Case for” You Have a H”Y

Do you have a horse with a problem with his head–meaning, does he have a potential brain tumor, chronic sinus infections, an upper airway abnormality, a dental abnormality, or another anomaly that needs further investigation? Veterinarians at

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Do you have a horse with a problem with his head–meaning, does he have a potential brain tumor, chronic sinus infections, an upper airway abnormality, a dental abnormality, or another anomaly that needs further investigation? Veterinarians at North Carolina State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine are looking for a horse that might fit this description to be the test “head case” for the Iams Pet Imaging MRI. The horse must be shipped to NCSU by noon on Wednesday, Sept. 22.


Richard A Mansmann, VMD, PhD, said he already has secured front and hind limb cases for the MRI study. He said the selected “head case” would be able to leave the hospital by Friday, Sept. 24. 


“All our MRI cases are placed under general anesthesia so they can be placed in the magnet and be still during the imaging,” said Mansmann. “The MRI fee of $1,900 will be waived and thus the bill would be $800 to $1,000 for anesthesia, lab tests, and hospitalization.”


If you would like to refer such case, please call Charlene today (Sept. 20) at 919/513-6630. The images will be read and results sent to the owner of the horse by Sept. 27

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Written by:

Stephanie L. Church, Editorial Director, grew up riding and caring for her family’s horses in Central Virginia and received a B.A. in journalism and equestrian studies from Averett University. She joined The Horse in 1999 and has led the editorial team since 2010. A 4-H and Pony Club graduate, she enjoys dressage, eventing, and trail riding with her former graded-stakes-winning Thoroughbred gelding, It Happened Again (“Happy”). Stephanie and Happy are based in Lexington, Kentucky.

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