Prototype Ionization Device Doesn’t Reduce Dust in Horse Stables

However, researchers did observe an 86% reduction in inhalable dust concentrations when horses were fed haylage instead of hay and stalls were bedded with wood shavings instead of straw.
Share
Favorite
Close

No account yet? Register

ADVERTISEMENT

reducing dust in horse barns
Researchers observed an 86% reduction in inhalable dust concentrations when horses were fed haylage instead of hay and stalls were bedded with wood shavings instead of straw. | Photo: iStock

Chickens are living healthier lives in housing equipped with new dust-reduction technology. While such technology could be useful for reducing dust in barns—especially for horses with equine asthma, which benefit from a low-dust environment—results from a new study suggest that the ionization technique isn’t effective in stables.

“We had hoped this method of ionization could benefit the air quality in horse stables and, indeed, it was a bit disappointing the system did not work as it has in small, confined spaces such as hatching cabinets for eggs,” said E.W. (Esther) Siegers, DVM, of the Utrecht University Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, in the Netherlands.

“However, I think it was quite a challenge for the ionization device to cope with the amount of dust in a big horse stable,” Siegers said

Create a free account with TheHorse.com to view this content.

TheHorse.com is home to thousands of free articles about horse health care. In order to access some of our exclusive free content, you must be signed into TheHorse.com.

Start your free account today!

Already have an account?
and continue reading.

Share

Written by:

Passionate about horses and science from the time she was riding her first Shetland Pony in Texas, Christa Lesté-Lasserre writes about scientific research that contributes to a better understanding of all equids. After undergrad studies in science, journalism, and literature, she received a master’s degree in creative writing. Now based in France, she aims to present the most fascinating aspect of equine science: the story it creates. Follow Lesté-Lasserre on Twitter @christalestelas.

Related Articles

Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with

FREE weekly newsletters from TheHorse.com

Sponsored Content

Weekly Poll

sponsored by:

What do you think: Can pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) be managed by medication alone?
111 votes · 111 answers

Readers’ Most Popular

Sign In

Don’t have an account? Register for a FREE account here.

Need to update your account?

You need to be logged in to fill out this form

Create a free account with TheHorse.com!