Gene Check Announces SCID Testing

According to information from Gene Check, Inc., an announcement on February 23, 1998, stated that the company has completed development and testing of a test for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in horses. SCID is a genetic disease of

Share
Favorite
Close

No account yet? Register

ADVERTISEMENT

According to information from Gene Check, Inc., an announcement on February 23, 1998, stated that the company has completed development and testing of a test for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in horses. SCID is a genetic disease of Arabian horses which has been shown to be linked to a single gene mutation. The disease is fatal when the mutation is homozygous, but without phenotypic effect in the carrier (heterozygous) state.


Gene Check’s test is designed to detect SCID carriers or SCID affected newborns. The test is a DNA test and currently requires a blood sample. Gene Check performs two independent tests on each sample to assure accuracy of the results. Results are reported confidentially and are not disclosed without the written permission of the person ordering the tests. DNA samples can be archived for future reference. Results are returned in seven to fourteen days after receipt of the blood and rush results (second business day after receipt of the sample) are available.


The cost of the test is $60 for five or more horses, $75 for two to four horses and $80 for a single horse. To qualify for the volume prices, it is only necessary that the samples be received in a single shipment, the horses may be from different herds.


Gene Check is a biotechnology company, founded in 1993, with a major focus on veterinary genotyping. Using its proprietary technology, Gene Check developed a test for scrapie susceptibility in sheep and tested over 5,000 sheep in 1997, including a large number from Great Britain. Gene Check also provides mutation detection reagents and kits for use in research

Create a free account with TheHorse.com to view this content.

TheHorse.com is home to thousands of free articles about horse health care. In order to access some of our exclusive free content, you must be signed into TheHorse.com.

Start your free account today!

Already have an account?
and continue reading.

Share

Written by:

Tim Brockhoff was Staff Writer of The Horse:Your Guide to Equine Health Care from 1995 to 1999. His degree is in Agricultural Communications from the University of Kentucky, and his equine experience is with American Saddlebreds.

Related Articles

Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with

FREE weekly newsletters from TheHorse.com

Sponsored Content

Weekly Poll

sponsored by:

Do you use slow feeders or slow feed haynets for your horse? Tell us why or why not.
342 votes · 342 answers

Readers’ Most Popular

Sign In

Don’t have an account? Register for a FREE account here.

Need to update your account?

You need to be logged in to fill out this form

Create a free account with TheHorse.com!