PMU Foals Arrive at Ryerss Farm for Adoption

On Sept. 6, the usually serene and peaceful atmosphere of Ryerss Farm for Aged Equines, in Pottstown, Pa., was transformed into a spirited playground upon the arrival of 50 new foals. Even after their long journey from a ranch in North Dakota,

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On Sept. 6, the usually serene and peaceful atmosphere of Ryerss Farm for Aged Equines, in Pottstown, Pa., was transformed into a spirited playground upon the arrival of 50 new foals. Even after their long journey from a ranch in North Dakota, the energy of the new foals quickly spread across the farm–the Ryerss aged residents seemed to have added a youthful spring to their step.


“Each year we look forward to the arrival of the foals. The added excitement is a refreshing change of pace for staff, volunteers and our equine residents,” said Joe Donahue, President of Ryerss Farm.


Ryerss Farm, in cooperation with the North American Equine Ranching Information Council (NAERIC), is in its third year hosting its own NAERIC, PMU foal adoption program-encouraged by both the growing interest from potential buyers and the success stories of past adopters.


These foals are unique because of the circumstances surrounding their births. PMU (pregnant mare’s urine) is used to produce a hormone replacement therapy, one of the most prescribed types of medications in the United States. Used by women to alleviate the symptoms of menopause and to prevent osteoporosis, the drug is produced from estrogens found in the urine of pregnant mares

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The Horse: Your Guide To Equine Health Care is an equine publication providing the latest news and information on the health, care, welfare, and management of all equids.

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