New VS Cases Drop to Nine in the Past Week

No new VSV-infected premises were identified in Nebraska or Utah. Colorado and Wyoming added new cases and premises.
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New VS Cases Drop to Nine in the Past Week
Vesicular stomatitis virus can cause blisters and sores in the mouth and on the tongue, muzzle, teats, or hooves of horses, cattle, swine, sheep, goats, llamas, and a number of other animals. Lesions usually heal in two or three weeks. | Photo: Courtesy Wyoming State Veterinarian's Office
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) issued a new Situation Report on Oct. 10 that confirmed nine new vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) cases since its previous report on Oct. 3.

Only one county, Clear Creek in Colorado, was confirmed as newly infected since Oct. 3. In all, Colorado had four new confirmed positive and three new suspect premises, and Wyoming had two new suspect premises identified that week.

Since the last situation report, the following previously VSV-infected or suspect premises were released from quarantine:

  • Seventeen in Colorado;
  • Three in Nebraska (all in Scotts Bluff County);
  • One in Utah (Uintah County); and
  • Nineteen in Wyoming.

VS 101

Vesicular stomatitis virus can cause blisters and sores in the mouth and on the tongue, muzzle, teats, or hooves of horses, cattle, swine, sheep, goats, llamas, and a number of other animals. Lesions usually heal in two or three weeks

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