UK Ag Equine Programs Leadership Transitions to MacLeod

James N. MacLeod, VMD, PhD, steps into the program’s director position for the second time. He also served as its first leader shortly after the program’s formation.
Share
Favorite
Close

No account yet? Register

ADVERTISEMENT

James N. MacLeod
MacLeod assumed leadership Oct. 1 from Mick Peterson, PhD, faculty member with the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, who is transitioning exclusively into an industry-critical role of surface safety research and service. | Photo: University of Kentucky's College of Agriculture
A familiar face is taking the leadership reins of University of Kentucky’s Ag Equine Programs. James N. MacLeod, VMD, PhD, John S. and Elizabeth A. Knight Chair within the Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center, is the program’s new director—a repeat performance, as he also holds the distinction of being its very first leader shortly after the program’s formation.

MacLeod assumed leadership Oct. 1 from Mick Peterson, PhD, faculty member with the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, who is transitioning exclusively into an industry-critical role of surface safety research and service. Peterson is considered the world’s leading expert on track surfaces and surface testing and has spent the past several decades of his career implementing a robust surface monitoring and testing program. With the recent announcement of funding by The Jockey Club, Peterson will now focus on enhancing current testing capabilities and building a research program at UK devoted to surface safety advancements, including efforts that will come from the recently announced National Thoroughbred Racing Association grant.

MacLeod, who previously served as UK Ag Equine Programs director from 2008 to 2011, is also the director of the UK Equestrian Sports Research Initiative. He leads the Gluck Center’s musculoskeletal laboratory, work he’s done for the past 16 years. His laboratory has gained national recognition in studying cartilage cell biology and through contributions to the equine genome project, focusing on the growth and maturation of articular cartilage, development and progression of osteoarthritis, and the repair of articular lesions.

“Academically and geographically, the University of Kentucky has every opportunity for continued national and international leadership in areas of equine science and scholarship,” MacLeod said. “I am honored to serve as director of Ag Equine Programs. UK is quite unique with regard to the breadth and scope of faculty and staff expertise actively participating in equine programs

Create a free account with TheHorse.com to view this content.

TheHorse.com is home to thousands of free articles about horse health care. In order to access some of our exclusive free content, you must be signed into TheHorse.com.

Start your free account today!

Already have an account?
and continue reading.

Share

Written by:

Related Articles

Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with

FREE weekly newsletters from TheHorse.com

Sponsored Content

Weekly Poll

sponsored by:

Do you use slow feeders or slow feed haynets for your horse? Tell us why or why not.
356 votes · 356 answers

Readers’ Most Popular

Sign In

Don’t have an account? Register for a FREE account here.

Need to update your account?

You need to be logged in to fill out this form

Create a free account with TheHorse.com!