Emergency Hoof Care: Pulled Shoes

Horses lose shoes for many reasons, and a lost shoe–or the cause of it–is the topic most likely to send a farrier’s blood pressure into orbit.
Share
Favorite
Close

No account yet? Register

ADVERTISEMENT

Have you ever noticed a group of serious “bikers” out on the highway on a weekend? Somewhere  behind them you’ll see a support vehicle, usually a van, full of tools, food and drink, luggage, and with room to load on a motorcycle or two in the event of a breakdown. The man (or woman) behind the wheel is called the “road captain.”

Now think of you and your friends out for an afternoon trail ride. Among the four of you, you don’t have even a Swiss Army knife, let alone a flashlight or a Band-Aid. People worry more about bringing along sunblock than a roll of Vet Wrap. Did anyone think to grab a trail map, or leave word back at the trailers where you were headed?

Bikers obviously are superior to trail riders in the pre-planning department. What’s also interesting is that someone who owns a motorcycle is more likely to understand its mechanics than someone who owns a horse is likely to understand a horse’s mechanics. Just ask anyone who has lost a shoe on the trail.

Horses lose shoes for many reasons, and a lost shoe–or the cause of it–is the topic most likely to send a farrier’s blood pressure into orbit

Create a free account with TheHorse.com to view this content.

TheHorse.com is home to thousands of free articles about horse health care. In order to access some of our exclusive free content, you must be signed into TheHorse.com.

Start your free account today!

Already have an account?
and continue reading.

Share

Written by:

Fran Jurga is the publisher of Hoofcare & Lameness, The Journal of Equine Foot Science, based in Gloucester, Mass., and Hoofcare Online, an electronic newsletter accessible at www.hoofcare.com. Her work also includes promoting lameness-related research and information for practical use by farriers, veterinarians, and horse owners. Jurga authored Understanding The Equine Foot, published by Eclipse Press and available at www.exclusivelyequine.com or by calling 800/582-5604.

Related Articles

Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with

FREE weekly newsletters from TheHorse.com

Sponsored Content

Weekly Poll

sponsored by:

Where do you go to find information on pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID)? Select all that apply.
78 votes · 136 answers

Readers’ Most Popular

Sign In

Don’t have an account? Register for a FREE account here.

Need to update your account?

You need to be logged in to fill out this form

Create a free account with TheHorse.com!