Respiratory Disease In Foals

What are the best things to do to prevent pneumonia and other problems from happening in the first place?
Share
Favorite
Close

No account yet? Register

ADVERTISEMENT

Q:What is the first thing I look for to tell if my foal has a respiratory problem, and what are the best things to do to prevent pneumonia and other problems from happening in the first place?


A:The most important signs of respiratory disease in neonatal foals are an increased respiratory rate (breathing hard), occasionally a cough, sometimes discharge from the nose, and fever. Some of the foals might be weak and have a difficult time getting up. These signs will all vary depending on the severity of the respiratory problem.

When a foal is born, you should run your finger along the roof of his mouth to check and see if the foal has a cleft palate. That congenital abnormality can cause the foal to get milk in its trachea and result in aspiration pneumonia. Some of these foals will have milk running out of their nose, another warning sign that pneumonia might occur.

Premature foals are at greater risk because they have poor lung development. You might notice that they have poor rib cage excursions, or their rib cage does not move in and out as well as that of a normal foal. Along with this goes poor expansion of the alveoli in the lung

Create a free account with TheHorse.com to view this content.

TheHorse.com is home to thousands of free articles about horse health care. In order to access some of our exclusive free content, you must be signed into TheHorse.com.

Start your free account today!

Already have an account?
and continue reading.

Share

Written by:

Fairfield T. Bain, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVIM, Dipl. ACVP, specializes in internal medicine and pathology. He is an equine technical services veterinarian at Merck Animal Health.

Related Articles

Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with

FREE weekly newsletters from TheHorse.com

Sponsored Content

Weekly Poll

sponsored by:

Do you use slow feeders or slow feed haynets for your horse? Tell us why or why not.
342 votes · 342 answers

Readers’ Most Popular

Sign In

Don’t have an account? Register for a FREE account here.

Need to update your account?

You need to be logged in to fill out this form

Create a free account with TheHorse.com!