Six Catastrophic Injuries Reported at Del Mar

Six horses have died from catastrophic injuries at Del Mar during a 10-day span that includes the first week of racing. Three occurred during morning training on Polytrack, two happened during races on Polytrack, and one was in a turf race.

The fatalities came from six different barns. Mad for Plaid, a maiden claimer trained by Peter Miller, fractured her left front sesamoids during

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Six horses have died from catastrophic injuries at Del Mar during a 10-day span that includes the first week of racing. Three occurred during morning training on Polytrack, two happened during races on Polytrack, and one was in a turf race.

The fatalities came from six different barns. Mad for Plaid, a maiden claimer trained by Peter Miller, fractured her left front sesamoids during training July 19, three days before the meet began. Mi Rey, from the Doug O’Neill barn, suffered a compound fracture of his right front fetlock when he went down in a $10,000 claiming race on opening day. Jockey Rafael Bejarano suffered facial fractures when struck by another horse.

Peanut Ridge, a 2-year-old trained by Chris Hartman, worked a half-mile July 23 on Polytrack in :48.80. The colt, who finished seventh at Lone Star June 12 in his only start for trainer John Tally, injured his right front leg during the work. He walked back to his barn, but had to be euthanized the following day.

I Want My Money, trained by Jeff Mullins, broke down in the left front nearing the wire of a starter allowance race July 24. Trainer Mike Mitchell lost Insider when the gelding suffered a compound fracture of his left rear in a starter allowance race on the turf July 26. The sixth incident occurred when $25,000 claimer Maggie and Hopie, trained by Jack Carava, broke her left front leg during a work on the main track July 28

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Written by:

Tracy Gantz is a freelance writer based in Southern California. She is the Southern California correspondent for The Blood-Horse and a regular contributor to Paint Horse Journal, Paint Racing News, and Appaloosa Journal.

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