High-Fat, High-Fiber Muesli for Ponies: Researchers Give Thumbs Up

A high-fat, high-fiber “museli” mix appeared to supply sports ponies with enough energy to perform well and maintain body condition while reducing blood glucose levels after meals, potentially reducing their risk of metabolic disorders.
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high-fat high-fiber muesli for ponies
Ponies are notorious for seeming to gain weight by even looking at a lush grassy pasture, but some of the more active ones or those in heavier work need more energy than what’s supplied via forage alone to maintain a good body condition. | Photo: iStock

Ponies are notorious for seeming to gain weight by even looking at a lush grassy pasture, but some of the more active ones need more energy than what’s supplied via forage alone. But how do you keep these insulin-resistance-prone equids in good body condition without causing their glucose to rise, potentially leading to metabolic issues?

German researchers say a specialized museli mix might be your best bet.

In their recent study a low-starch, high-fat and -fiber muesli mix gave sports ponies enough energy to perform well and maintain body condition while reducing blood glucose levels after meals. That mix also kept ponies chewing meals longer, prolonging the feeding time and increasing saliva production, which contribute to good digestion

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Passionate about horses and science from the time she was riding her first Shetland Pony in Texas, Christa Lesté-Lasserre writes about scientific research that contributes to a better understanding of all equids. After undergrad studies in science, journalism, and literature, she received a master’s degree in creative writing. Now based in France, she aims to present the most fascinating aspect of equine science: the story it creates. Follow Lesté-Lasserre on Twitter @christalestelas.

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