Cornell University Studies The Use of Amorphous Silicate Dressing for Wound Care

The study investigated that wounds treated with an amorphous silicate dressing would have minimal complications and lesion resolution without formation of exuberant granulation tissue.
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Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine reports good results in equine distal limb wound healing with the use of an Amorphous Silicate Dressing.

6 April 2023, Athboy Ireland   Zarasyl, the leading producer of amorphous silicate based barrier creams for equine and companion animals, would like to congratulate the team at Cornell University’s Department of Clinical Sciences on the publication of their study on assessing the use of amorphous silicate dressing in the management of horses with naturally occurring full thickness skin lacerations. The study can be read in full at JAVMA.

The study investigated that wounds treated with an amorphous silicate dressing would have minimal complications and lesion resolution without formation of exuberant granulation tissue (EGT). The study was conducted in conjunction with veterinarians across the United States. Less wound complications were seen in horses treated with the amorphous silicate and the study concluded that the technology produces good results in equine distal limb wound healing. Full results are available for review at JAVMA .  Zarasyl Equine Barrier cream was used at the topical amorphous silicate dressing.

Zarasyl the veterinarian-backed formula is powered by an exclusive patented technology composed of amorphous silica and inspired by over 10 years of research and innovation. Zarasyl’s unique formula contains amorphous silica with a molecular structure tailored to provide sustained delivery of orthosilicic acid to the skin. Orthosilicic acid is the form of silicon associated with healthy connective tissue growth. Zarasyl’s barrier creams have been formulated to address the key requirements for an ideal wound healing modality. Developed in conjunction with a team of scientists, Zarasyl is bringing human science and revolutionary silicate technology to the veterinary industry.

As a company that is passionate about science and animal welfare, Zarasyl is delighted with the publication of this report. Zarasyl CEO Adrienne Magnier states, “Since 2019, we’ve worked with veterinarians to improve animal welfare. It is a huge endorsement of our efforts and technology that Cornell University chose to do a field study using Zarasyl. We have seen how our easy to use, patented formula successfully improved the lives of animals across the globe, we are delighted that the team at Cornell University has shared their findings on the use of amorphous silicate technology”.

Zarasyl Equine product has not been evaluated by the regulatory authorities for the indications discussed in the paper and veterinarians should only use Zarasyl as per the product labelling.

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Established in 2019, Zarasyl is an innovative animal skincare company that has brought cutting-edge human science to veterinarians and equestrians worldwide. The silicate technology behind our steroid and antibiotic-free products was initially developed for use in human science, but founder Adrienne Magnier quickly realized the benefits for animal health as well. Created in collaboration with a team of scientists, Zarasyl is a competition-safe topical cream containing an amorphous silica with a molecular structure tailored to provide sustained delivery of orthosilicic acid to the skin. Zarasyl Equine and Companion Animal Solutions are available through our network of distribution partners.

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