Nelson Receives AAEP Foundation Past Presidents’ Fellow

Nelson is researching early arthritis detection.
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Colorado State University (CSU) doctoral candidate Brad Nelson, DVM, MS, received the 2013 AAEP Foundation Past Presidents’ Research Fellow for his research into early detection of osteoarthritis, a progressive disease that incurs significant costs and morbidity to the horse industry.

Nelson was recognized Dec. 9 during the Frank J. Milne State-of-the-Art Lecture at the AAEP’s 59th Annual Convention in Nashville, Tenn. The $5,000 grant is awarded annually to a doctoral or residency student who has made significant progress in the field of equine health care research.

Nelson’s research seeks to detect cartilage injury in the early stages of osteoarthritis, which would enable institution of earlier treatments that have better success providing long-term comfort to the horse. His project investigates whether decreased equine articular cartilage glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content can be detectible and correlative with computed tomography attenuation using cationic contrast agents in an impact model of osteoarthritis. The research will compare and develop correlations between articular cartilage GAG content and contrast enhanced CT attenuation in the horse.

Nelson received his DVM from the University of Wisconsin in 2009. He completed his surgical residency at CSU in June 2013 and is currently pursuing his PhD at the CSU Orthopaedic Research Center

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