Equine Herpesvirus Type-1 Outbreak Resolving; Strain Might be Atypical

The worst is over in the unusual equine herpesvirus type-1 (EHV-1) outbreak that led to the death of 10 horses and has affected the remaining equine population at the University of Findlay’s English riding facility in Findlay, Ohio, since Jan. 12. Veterinarians have not detected any new cases of the respiratory and neurological illness in the last five days at the facility. Ten horses with

Share
Favorite
Close

No account yet? Register

ADVERTISEMENT

The worst is over in the unusual equine herpesvirus type-1 (EHV-1) outbreak that led to the death of 10 horses and has affected the remaining equine population at the University of Findlay’s English riding facility in Findlay, Ohio, since Jan. 12. Veterinarians have not detected any new cases of the respiratory and neurological illness in the last five days at the facility. Ten horses with neurologic signs are stable and under treatment at Findlay, while two horses remained in critical condition at The Ohio State University’s veterinary teaching hospital Jan. 28. Epidemiological studies are being completed to figure out where the virus came from, and scientists are comparing the strain to others found in past outbreaks.

The EHV-1 organism can spread quickly from horse to horse through aerosol droplets in the air or contact with equipment used by affected horses (only in the very early stages and not for a long time as the virus does not live in the environment for a long time) and can cause three different forms of disease, including rhinopneumonitis (a respiratory disease of mostly young horses), abortions in pregnant mares, and neurologic disease. The stricken horses in Findlay showed clinical signs of the respiratory and neurological forms. There are at least seven other strains of equine herpesviruses, named in order of their discovery. (See article #32 at www.TheHorse.com for more on herpesviruses.) The neurologic form of EHV-1 often is survivable with supportive care, but unfortunately once a horse is recumbent, it is difficult to nurse the horse back to health

Create a free account with TheHorse.com to view this content.

TheHorse.com is home to thousands of free articles about horse health care. In order to access some of our exclusive free content, you must be signed into TheHorse.com.

Start your free account today!

Already have an account?
and continue reading.

Share

Written by:

Stephanie L. Church, Editorial Director, grew up riding and caring for her family’s horses in Central Virginia and received a B.A. in journalism and equestrian studies from Averett University. She joined The Horse in 1999 and has led the editorial team since 2010. A 4-H and Pony Club graduate, she enjoys dressage, eventing, and trail riding with her former graded-stakes-winning Thoroughbred gelding, It Happened Again (“Happy”). Stephanie and Happy are based in Lexington, Kentucky.

Related Articles

Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with

FREE weekly newsletters from TheHorse.com

Sponsored Content

Weekly Poll

sponsored by:

Do you use slow feeders or slow feed haynets for your horse? Tell us why or why not.
289 votes · 289 answers

Readers’ Most Popular

Sign In

Don’t have an account? Register for a FREE account here.

Need to update your account?

You need to be logged in to fill out this form

Create a free account with TheHorse.com!