Ohio Announces Probable Human WNV Case

On April 9, the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) announced its first probable case of West Nile virus (WNV) in 2004. The patient is a 79-year-old male from Scioto County.

With warm weather in recent weeks, mosquitoes have become active,”P>On April 9, the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) announced its fi

Share
Favorite
Close

No account yet? Register

ADVERTISEMENT

On April 9, the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) announced its first probable case of West Nile virus (WNV) in 2004. The patient is a 79-year-old male from Scioto County.


“With warm weather in recent weeks, mosquitoes have become active,” said ODH Director J. Nick Baird, MD. “(This) development should remind us all of the importance of taking personal protection measures and working to eliminate mosquito breeding sites on and around our properties.”


In 2003, Ohio reported 108 probable and confirmed human case of WNV and eight WNV-related deaths; the first human case was reported July 18. In 2002, Ohio reported 441 human cases and 31 deaths.


Human WNV cases typically do not appear until late summer in Ohio; ODH and the local health authorities are working to determine where the patient may have been exposed to the virus.”West Nile virus and other vector-borne illnesses are preventable,” Baird said. “By taking some simple steps you can help ensure you and your loved ones remain healthy and safe when outside this spring and summer

Create a free account with TheHorse.com to view this content.

TheHorse.com is home to thousands of free articles about horse health care. In order to access some of our exclusive free content, you must be signed into TheHorse.com.

Start your free account today!

Already have an account?
and continue reading.

Share

Written by:

Product and information releases by various organizations and companies.

Related Articles

Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with

FREE weekly newsletters from TheHorse.com

Sponsored Content

Weekly Poll

sponsored by:

Where do you go to find information on pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID)? Select all that apply.
78 votes · 136 answers

Readers’ Most Popular

Sign In

Don’t have an account? Register for a FREE account here.

Need to update your account?

You need to be logged in to fill out this form

Create a free account with TheHorse.com!