How to Be Prepared for Farm Calls

We asked two mobile equine veterinarians how clients can prepare both themselves and their horses for veterinary visits. Here are 10 ways you can help your vet maximize time, cut costs, and ensure you get the service you want—and, perhaps, go the extra mile when you need it most.
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How to be Prepared for Farm Calls
When the veterinarian arrives, have your horse in haltered and in hand (or in cross-ties or in the stall), and make sure you're dressed appropriately to assist. | Photo: Anne M. Eberhardt/The Horse

10 steps toward more positive experiences during farm calls and emergencies

Have you ever waited for your horse’s veterinarian for what seemed like an eternity past the appointment time, your frustration building by the minute? Have you ever had trouble getting any vet out in an emergency, much less your own, or ever swallowed—hard—when you learned the cost for the services performed? Have you ever considered what can you do to avoid these scenarios or alleviate or even eliminate these negative feelings?

It might behoove you to put yourself in your practitioners’ shoes for a moment. Veterinarians don’t start each day planning how they can get under your skin. They want to give you and your horses the best service they possibly can. They’ve gone through years of specialized schooling and training to ensure they can do just that. And they’ve taken an oath to use their knowledge and skills for the benefit of society, to promote equine health and welfare, to relieve animal suffering, to protect public and environmental health, and to advance comparative medical knowledge.

So what’s your part in the process? We asked two mobile equine veterinarians — Danny Borders, DVM, of Borders Equine Clinic, in Middleton, Idaho, and Brittany First, DVM, of First Equine Veterinary Services, in Mobile, Alabama—how clients can prepare both themselves and their horses for veterinary visits. Read on to learn 10 ways you can help your veterinarian maximize time, cut costs, and ensure you get the service you want—and, perhaps, go the extra mile when you need it most

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Written by:

Diane Rice earned her bachelor’s degree in agricultural journalism from the University of Wisconsin, then married her education with her lifelong passion for horses by working in editorial positions at Appaloosa Journal for 12 years. She has also served on the American Horse Publications’ board of directors. She now freelances in writing, editing, and proofreading. She lives in Middleton, Idaho, and spends her spare time gardening, reading, serving in her church, and spending time with her daughters, their families, and a myriad of her own and other people’s pets.

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