10 Secrets to a Good Vet-Client-Patient Relationship

To help you better understand the ideal VCPR—a relationship that carries a lot of weight in our horsey lives—we’ve sought out the signs of a healthy one. How does yours line up?
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10 Secrets to a Good Vet-Client-Patient Relationship
When it comes to the veterinarian-client-patient relationship (VCPR), that’s exactly what we’re looking at: three individuals coming together to form a mutually respectful (as much as the horse is capable, of course), long-term bond that focuses on the horse while safeguarding the veterinarian and the owner. | Photo: Anne M. Eberhardt/The Horse

What is a VCPR, and how can it benefit you, your veterinarian, and your horse?

Any relationship can be challenging at times. When a third party comes into the picture, however, the work gets even harder. Let’s say the relationship affects the health of one, the finances of another, the professional reputation of the other, and the general well-being of all three.

When it comes to the veterinarian-client-patient relationship (VCPR), that’s exactly what we’re looking at: three individuals coming together to form a mutually respectful (as much as the horse is capable, of course), long-term bond that focuses on the horse while safeguarding the veterinarian and the owner. It’s not an easy task! And it takes a lot of thought and consideration.

That’s why we’ve gone to the “relationship experts” of the equine veterinary world. To help you better understand the ideal VCPR—a relationship that carries a lot of weight in our horsey lives—we’ve sought out the signs of a healthy one

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Passionate about horses and science from the time she was riding her first Shetland Pony in Texas, Christa Lesté-Lasserre writes about scientific research that contributes to a better understanding of all equids. After undergrad studies in science, journalism, and literature, she received a master’s degree in creative writing. Now based in France, she aims to present the most fascinating aspect of equine science: the story it creates. Follow Lesté-Lasserre on Twitter @christalestelas.

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