Switzerland Revives Voluntary Equine Disease Surveillance System

Switzerland’s internet-based voluntary system is a way for veterinarians to report equine infections, such as influenza and herpesvirus, even if they aren’t required to by law.
Share
Favorite
Close

No account yet? Register

ADVERTISEMENT

equine diseases
Switzerland's Internet-based voluntary system is a way for veterinarians to report equine infections, such as influenza and herpesvirus, even if they aren’t required to by law. | Photo: iStock
Infectious diseases can spread quickly. But knowing about outbreaks helps curb epidemics and keep more horses safe.

That’s why Switzerland is joining the ranks of a few select other countries offering an internet-based voluntary reporting system. It’s a way for veterinarians to report infections, such as influenza and herpesvirus, even if they aren’t required to by law. The reporting makes the information public for the entire country to see and react accordingly.

“Most of the diseases we see are the non-notifiable ones, so there’s a real need to have a look at these endemic diseases in our horse population in order to keep them under control,” said Franziska Remy-Wohlfender, DrMetVet, Dipl. ECVPH, a specialist in equine practice at the University of Bern Vetsuisse Faculty’s Swiss Institute of Equine Medicine, in Switzerland.

Notifiable diseases are those practitioners are required by law to report to authorities if they diagnose them. In Switzerland as well as most developed countries, these include such diseases as equine infectious anemia (EIA), equine viral arteritis (EVA), West Nile virus, African horse sickness (AHS), various forms of encephalitis (Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan), and contagious equine metritis (CEM)

Create a free account with TheHorse.com to view this content.

TheHorse.com is home to thousands of free articles about horse health care. In order to access some of our exclusive free content, you must be signed into TheHorse.com.

Start your free account today!

Already have an account?
and continue reading.

Share

Written by:

Passionate about horses and science from the time she was riding her first Shetland Pony in Texas, Christa Lesté-Lasserre writes about scientific research that contributes to a better understanding of all equids. After undergrad studies in science, journalism, and literature, she received a master’s degree in creative writing. Now based in France, she aims to present the most fascinating aspect of equine science: the story it creates. Follow Lesté-Lasserre on Twitter @christalestelas.

Related Articles

Stay on top of the most recent Horse Health news with

FREE weekly newsletters from TheHorse.com

Sponsored Content

Weekly Poll

sponsored by:

Which skin issue do you battle most frequently with your horse?
250 votes · 250 answers

Readers’ Most Popular

Sign In

Don’t have an account? Register for a FREE account here.

Need to update your account?

You need to be logged in to fill out this form

Create a free account with TheHorse.com!