Washington Horse Farm Uses Rain Gardens for Mud Control in Paddocks and Mountain Trail Course

The owners of this recently purchased 17-acre farm are incorporating rain gardens in paddocks and on a mountain trail course to help with mud control.
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Kelly and Dan Munro, owners of Grateful Pine Farm, a recently purchased a 17-acre commercial horse property in Snohomish, WA. | Photo: Jessica Paige

Kelly and Dan Munro, owners of Grateful Pine Farm, purchased a 17-acre commercial horse property in Snohomish, Washington, this past spring. Recently, I interviewed Kelly Munro to get to know a little more about her and her approach to managing horse land and her new commercial horse boarding/training facility. Munro’s new property will be featuring some innovative and exciting new management techniques that I want to highlight and share with a larger audience.

Q: What’s your background with horses, and what kind of riding you do?

Munro: I’ve been riding for 20+ years and have been a horse and farm owner and worked at numerous equestrian facilities during that time. I’m a dressage rider, trail rider, and I also breed and train Norwegian Fjord horses. My philosophy is to build flexibility, strength, and confidence in the horse through gentle, varied exercises and clear, correct riding, so they can happily pursue any activity in partnership with their rider.

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Written by:

Alayne Blickle, a lifelong equestrian and ranch riding competitor, is the creator/director of Horses for Clean Water, an award-winning, internationally acclaimed environmental education program for horse owners. Well-known for her enthusiastic, down-to-earth approach, Blickle is an educator and photojournalist who has worked with horse and livestock owners since 1990 teaching manure composting, pasture management, mud and dust control, water conservation, chemical use reduction, firewise, and wildlife enhancement. She teaches and travels North America and writes for horse publications. Blickle and her husband raise and train their mustangs and quarter horses at their eco-sensitive guest ranch, Sweet Pepper Ranch, in sunny Nampa, Idaho.

12 Responses

  1. re: Washington Horse Farm Uses Rain Gardens for Mud Control in Paddocks and Mountain Trail Course

    I came here for info on rain gardens and how to minimize mud in my turnout paddocks and pasture. I got a little info which I will use. If the people who left all the negative comments donated the $$$$ or acreage instead of insults, I believe life would

  2. re: Washington Horse Farm Uses Rain Gardens for Mud Control in Paddocks and Mountain Trail Course

    I agree with all the positive comments.

    To those with negatives:

    Owner said "The property is set up to accommodate about 40 horses, but that’s a lot of horses even on 17 acres, so we have to redo cross fencing so that pastures and

  3. re: Washington Horse Farm Uses Rain Gardens for Mud Control in Paddocks and Mountain Trail Course

    I can’t find the FAVORITE button to save this article into my collection, anyone else have this issue? Great Article Alayne. The owner did say she was going to rearrange the paddocks. I am sure one that is done, there won’t be 40 horses on 17 acres She

  4. re: Washington Horse Farm Uses Rain Gardens for Mud Control in Paddocks and Mountain Trail Course

    I appreciate that the owners of Grateful Pine Farm have undertaken the challenge of renovating and improving a previous commercial horse facility with the intention of providing as optimal an environment as possible given the existing situation and con

  5. re: Washington Horse Farm Uses Rain Gardens for Mud Control in Paddocks and Mountain Trail Course

    It does seem like a lot of horses for the space but adult horses don’t need as much room to run and they don’t mention breeding.  Hopefully they aren’t!!!  What I find horrendous is that in addition to all the horrors farm animals endure the

  6. re: Washington Horse Farm Uses Rain Gardens for Mud Control in Paddocks and Mountain Trail Course

    We purchased our 20 acre farm in 1998.It was somewhat rundown and overgrazed.By only having no more than 1 horse per two acres and allowing the grasses/ vetch to go to seed we have been able to crowd out tar weed and other tough to eradicate weeds. Hav

  7. re: Washington Horse Farm Uses Rain Gardens for Mud Control in Paddocks and Mountain Trail Course

    With all due respect, I cannot imagine 40 horses on 17 acres. The farm where my horse is located, not far from Monroe, is 15 acres and generally no more than 15 horse. And even that is pushing the limits of the property. The rule of thumb has always be

  8. re: Washington Horse Farm Uses Rain Gardens for Mud Control in Paddocks and Mountain Trail Course

    I agree with kay it would have been nice to have seen pictures of a rain garden and a better explanation,also I kind of agree with susan some comments seemed a little harsh,but where I live they say the first acre is for one horse and every half acre a

  9. re: Washington Horse Farm Uses Rain Gardens for Mud Control in Paddocks and Mountain Trail Course

    Geez!  The last two comments are pretty harsh. I’m sure Grateful Pine did not agree to the interview to be criticized. Thanks for some ideas on farm management. Also I appreciate the overall genuine concern for the horses and the environment, 40 h

  10. re: Washington Horse Farm Uses Rain Gardens for Mud Control in Paddocks and Mountain Trail Course

    This article would be more beneficial if we were told what a "rain garden" is and how to make one.  A picture of one would be nice too.  But 40 horses on 17 acres…not!

  11. re: Washington Horse Farm Uses Rain Gardens for Mud Control in Paddocks and Mountain Trail Course

    There is no way 40 horses can have a quality life on 17 acres.  Horses need enough room to gallop at full speed and play with other horses.  It is best if they have varied terrain and natural challenges in their daily life.  This is a ho

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