Weed of the Month

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Weed of the Month: Creeping Charlie

Weed of the Month: Creeping Charlie

Creeping Charlie, or ground ivy, is toxic, but generally horses must consume large quantities for a reaction to occur.

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Weed of the Month: Hemp Dogbane

Weed of the Month: Hemp Dogbane

Hemp dogbane is poisonous to horses. The leaves are toxic at all times, even when dried in haybales.

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Weed of the Month: Wild Violet

Weed of the Month: Wild Violet

Wild violet is distributed widely throughout the eastern United States and occurs most frequently in highly maintained pastures, turf grass, and landscapes.

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Weed of the Month: Curly Dock

Weed of the Month: Curly Dock

Curly dock grows well in alfalfa, disturbed sites, cultivated fields, ditches, and especially in compacted, overgrazed pastures.

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Weed of the Month: Horsenettle

Weed of the Month: Horsenettle

Horsenettle is distributed widely across most of the United States, especially in the eastern half and the western coastal states.

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Weed of the Month: Nimblewill

Weed of the Month: Nimblewill

Horses and other animals rarely consume nimblewill, so the plant often persists in pastures.

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Weed of the Month: Common Ragweed

Weed of the Month: Common Ragweed

Common ragweed is distributed widely across the United States and occurs in pastures and cultivated crops. Infestations in pastures are usually more of a problem during periods of drought or when overgrazing occurs.

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Weed of the Month: Buttercups

Weed of the Month: Buttercups

Buttercups can be poisonous to horses, but the plants are not palatable and animals usually do not eat them.

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Weed of the Month: Chicory

Weed of the Month: Chicory

Chicory is not as common as many weeds in horse pastures but occurs in more abundance in unmowed pastures.

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Weed of the Month: Poison Hemlock

Weed of the Month: Poison Hemlock

Poison hemlock is extremely poisonous to horses and humans, however horses rarely eat this plant because of its low palatability.

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Weed of the Month: Musk Thistle

Weed of the Month: Musk Thistle

Musk thistle is distributed across the United States and is listed as noxious in many states.

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Weed of the Month: Eastern Poison Ivy

Weed of the Month: Eastern Poison Ivy

Animals such as cats, dogs, and horses are not sensitive to poison ivy, but can transfer the irritating urushiol oil to humans.

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Weed of the Month: Perilla Mint

Weed of the Month: Perilla Mint

Perilla mint is toxic to horses and the greatest risk of consumption is in late summer or early fall.

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Weed of the Month: Henbit

Weeds of the Month: Henbit and Purple Deadnettle

Henbit and purple deadnettle are winter annual species found throughout the eastern United States. These weeds thrive in both cool-season and warm-season forage grasses.

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