A Review of Imaging Options for Subtle Lamenesses

A veterinarian weighs in on radiographs, nuclear scintigraphy, and standing MRI for diagnosing subtle lamenesses.
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A Review of Imaging Options for Subtle Lamenesses
Nuclear scintigraphy is especially useful for honing in on the locations of active bone conditions in horses. | Photo: Anthony Pease

Ten years ago, if your horse turned up lame, chances are the problem would be obvious and the diagnosis easy. Today’s more astute horse owner is far more in tune with his or her horse, and we’re seeing more subtle lamenesses stemming from all parts of the body. Unfortunately, this can make diagnosing today’s lame horse a bit trickier. That’s where nuclear medicine comes in.

During the 2014 American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention, held Dec. 6-10 in Salt Lake City, Utah, Anthony Pease, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVR, section chief of diagnostic imaging at Michigan State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, in East Lansing, described the current diagnostic imaging environment for horses.

“The purpose of this review is to discuss the use of radiographs, nuclear medicine, and standing MRI in the equine patient and describe the limitations and methods to overcome these limitations,” Pease began

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Alexandra Beckstett, a native of Houston, Texas, is a lifelong horse owner who has shown successfully on the national hunter/jumper circuit and dabbled in hunter breeding. After graduating from Duke University, she joined Blood-Horse Publications as assistant editor of its book division, Eclipse Press, before joining The Horse. She was the managing editor of The Horse for nearly 14 years and is now editorial director of EquiManagement and My New Horse, sister publications of The Horse.

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